Saturday, 9 March 2013

"pain demands to be felt."


You haven't experienced phenomenal literature that gives you apocalyptic bursts of emotion unless you have read "The Fault in our Stars" by John Green. This post somewhat resembles a book review, but I feel like an unexperienced kid (which is what I am) writing it. 

I started the book with the one thought in my mind: "When is the tear bomb going to drop" All my friends basically represented the book as a collection of veritably unfortunate events that happen to a pair of cancer ridden teenage lovers. Personally, I enjoy feeling a great deal of emotion. I  am most inspired to write poetry, pieces of texts, or blog posts as this one when I am feeling one of the extremes. Either happy, or sad. Right now, I am to a great extent, sad. 

There is actually no way to explain the book unless you yourself read it. I will attempt to give you an insight as to how exactly Green plans and executes his chapters. There is always a life lesson. I have, at least thirty times in the book, put it down and deeply thought about the message he so eagerly tries to convey to the reader. Messages such as how: everybody gets tired of the beauty they originally found so fascinating at some point, how there are smaller, and larger infinites, and how there nothing great truly lasts forever. Some of these life lessons have been revisited in the book, yes, but the way Green recites it is like nothing I have ever read before.

The best part, there is no happy ending. Sorry if this is a spoiler, but everyone is dead. Which at the end of the day, is usually the case in the world. There are rare cases where people with a cancer recurrence or a terminal tumor end their life festooned with positivity and happiness. There is hardship and struggle, and John Green represents that brilliantly. He writes a real story. A story of a girl and a boy who are both dying. They are dying, and they die. There is no sugarcoating, they die. 

At the end of the day, a book is just a collection of blank pages filled in with printed text. Everything is just as basic when an individual thinks about a certain concept in its simplest form. Its the content that brings something alive. John Green, it is inexplainable how a 35 year old author who has no personal connection to the death of a lover, can create such a heart wrenching piece of literature where for even the strongest of people, tearing up or sobbing is inevitable. In my opinion, Green is by far one of the most skilled authors of our time. He writes with such clarity and grace, that he can turn flipping pancakes into either a crying fest, or an event that deserves manic laughter. The reader cannot help but ponder over every beautiful word. 

Personally, I am still grieving. The book is emotionally sabotaging, and I am practically drowning in my own tears. It is a brilliant read and I highly recommend it to everyone. 



11 comments:

  1. Antara Verma, I love you. You have described EXACTLY what I feel of TFIOS and John. Honestly, I was a bit worried at first. The feeling that I felt towards TFIOS was the same to how Hazel felt about An Imperial Affliction (a book I wish truly was real). I was scared. TFIOS is a book a treasure dearly, John as well, I didn't want to share it with you. I knew you'd understand but I was selfish. I am selfish. It is a beautiful book that I wish only a few people know about. I know how selfish that is and I am EXTREMELY glad for John's success but as readers, this is how we feel. Do you not feel the same way? Do you not worry that the people you recommend this book to won't /get/ it, won't /understand/?

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    1. Megeg, I have known you since Grade 6, so I have a relatively clear understanding about how you are when you are truly passionate about something. I knew you you were not jumping with joy that I was reading the book because I might have not understood it, so I specifically reread any parts I had doubts about so it was 100% crystal clear. I wholeheartedly wish An Imperial Affliction was a real book and tried researching it for hours after finishing the first few chapters. Frankly, I only recommend books to people who I know will have the same appreciation for it as I do, which is why I am only recommending it to my parents and a specific amount of friends.

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  3. Despite the fact I am not as passionate about books as you guys are. Megan and Aditi forced me to read this novel and in the beginning I was dreading it but once I began I just couldn't stop. The way you describe and explain how you felt when reading this book was the exact way I felt. I never ever cry in books but this one I just burst out in tears. I am obsessed, and I mean obsessed with Augustus. Im sure all of us would agree that we can read this book over and over. And at the same time if people do not feel the same way you felt when reading this I would be shocked. Who is your favorite character? Why? I saw you highlighting words and phrases in the novel, does this help?

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    1. Thanks Saiyuri, nice to know you enjoyed the book and I share mutual feelings about its depth of sadness. My favorite character is Augustus, of course, although I am very fond of Isaac as well. He is a laugh and he was a good addition to the novel. I highlight phrases in novels I really, really love so I can refer to them later. It helps because I can find them easily when I want to read them to my parents or my friends.

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  4. A few quick things:

    1. Love, love, love the passion you are showing for this book. The voice you are using for this post is elegant and heartfelt and shows a passion and devotion to your love of this text. Well done.

    2. Couldn't be more proud of the little community you are building here and the maturity with which you are discussing this book. Love coming to posts and seeing comments waiting for me.

    3. I gotta read this book and see if the hype is for real. Mrs. Raisdana has read this book too. I will try to get to it soon. Thanks you guys for making these spaces real, but filling them with your thoughts and ideas.

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  5. I haven't read the book (won't read the book either, I would be poor company for a long time afterwards) but I have experienced people I love dying. If an author can express the emotions loss brings this well, I can see how you feel passionately about it.

    How will this book change you? What, if anything, will you do differently now? I'm not sure a book can be truly great if it doesn't change us somehow.

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    1. TFIOS has definitely given me a deeper appreciation for my life. I understand this is relatively cliche, but I had surges of happiness that I was not hooked up to an oxygen tank or had to visit the doctor for a lung cleaning every month. I have developed more sympathy for cancer in general, as I now understand the great impact it has on people's lives.

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  6. This sums up the power of this wonderful book succinctly, passionately and vividly. I LOVE this book (and most of John Green's work) and I am trying to get my learners to read it too.

    Your response is mature, authentic inspiring -and I would really like to share it with my learners - would that be ok?

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    1. Thank you so much. Yes that would be wonderful :)

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